Cholula 90

Location:

Condesa, CDMX

Year:

2003

Area:

8,557 sq ft.

Status:

Built

 

The project’s composition is the result of a long negotiation with theNational Institute of Fine Arts to substitute a historical building for amore contemporary one. Inspired by the paintings of Mondrian—reinterpretedas monochromatic abstraction, the work consists of twoblocks with six apartments in each.

Each block is separated by a nucleus of stairs that lead up to theunits. A fragmented wall houses the stairs and covering, in a sculpturalcomposition at the heart of the project. The shape of the lot, withmore frontage at the back, suggests a slanted wall on the left side,breaking up the symmetry of both blocks, and forming a class of patioat the front that is integrated structurally with two metal crosses.

Both the vertical and horizontal elements were conceived to highlightthe slimness of the volume and, when crossed, give way to twospaces: one for transit and the other open. The windowsills compose figures with three opalescent glasses, producing a play of reflections during the day and shadows at night that create an urban painting.


The intermediate spaces play a central role. In the aesthetic sense, they confer dynamism at the overlapping of lines and materials; in the functional aspect, they allow for the illumination and ventilation of the spaces.

The living and dining rooms face the front; kitchen and services look toward the center. The two bedrooms, located at the back, can be joined to make up a suite with a bedroom and work space. The solid metal access doors lend privacy and security to the interior spaces without affecting the translucent composition at the street level.

 

Architectural Project:

Jacobo Micha Mizrahi

Collaborators:

Luis R. González Villamil, Ernesto Rossell Zanotelli, Aldo Moreno Gamboa, Ulises Pablo Díaz, Miguel Flores

Structure:

DYS / Alejandro Fierro

Construction:

Archetonic / Jacobo Micha, Omar Parra, Ernesto Barrera

Technical Installations:

Instalaciones 2000 / Rafael Gasman

Furniture:

José Micha

Photography:

Luis Gordoa, Tomás Casademunt

 

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